Gray Hair and Black Iron by Brooks Kubik

Posted on Saturday, September 23rd, 2017 by John Wood
Can any Lifter REALLY Gain Strength and Muscle at any age?
The Answer is YES!
GRAY HAIR AND BLACK IRON, the first and only book of its kind, shows you how!

Let’s face it… most of the training info these days is written by (and for) muscle heads. There is little ‘there’ for anyone who is serious about getting results and this is especially true for older lifters who have been around the block a few times and are tired of the latest “fads”.

Without many places to turn for the right kind of training info, many older lifters have thrown their hands up in frustration… but now a completely new kind of training guide has come along to turn the tide in a completely different direction.

A Book for Older Lifters… and Not a Moment Too Soon!

Brooks Kubik famously wrote the modern classic Dinosaur Training back in 1996 which was and is the book that thousands upon thousands of trainees list as their strength bible. While the methods and techniques of Dinosaur Training have certainly stood the test of time, Brooks found that, as the years went on, some of the things that he once talked about needed to be adjusted a bit.

Of course, Brooks wasn’t the only one interested and in this type of information, the entire generation of Dino trainees wanted (and needed) to hear it as well. Brooks looked high and low and when he didn’t find what he was looking for he realized that he was going to have to be the one to write it The result was a classic for a whole new generation: Gray Hair and Black Iron,which was written specifically with older lifters in mind.

Teaches You Exactly What to Do…and How to Do It

You sure don’t have to be satisfied lifting soup cans or the ridiculously light plastic dumbbells that are often suggested for older lifters in the popular fare. Gray Hair and Black Iron is all about serious training at an advanced age. We’re talking about gaining strength, adding muscle and staying injury-free, even if you happen to have a few more candles on your birthday cake. Here’s a look at some of the material covered in Gray Hair and Black Iron

CHAPTER ONE: Recovery and Recuperation for Older Lifters Why older trainees need a different type of training … Peary Rader’s viewpoint on older lifters … The two most important keys to training success for older lifters … Why the training principles in this book apply to Olympic Weightlifters, Powerlifters, Strongman trainees, Bodybuilders and anyone else who ever lifted a weight … The area of the body that requires the greatest recovery time … An interesting point from Russian research on Olympic weightlifters

CHAPTER TWO: Abbreviated Training for Older Lifters... The ideal workout length… How workouts have changed through time and a typical workout for Brooks… Favorite exercises… How to train with the Trap Bar… How to perform Divided Workouts in order to maintain enthusiasm

CHAPTER THREE: Sets and Reps for Older Lifters … Seven different approaches … The Seven Important benefits of low rep training … The best way to warm up … How to develop more precise movement patterns … Building the “Success” habit … How to get even better results by spending even LESS time at the gym … Tommy Kono’s squat advice … Training for increased bone density … Strengthening the joints, tendons and ligaments

CHAPTER FOUR: More Straight Talk on Sets and Reps for Older Lifters … Examples of effective warmup sets … Singles, Doubles and Triples for Older Lifters … The rep range that gives the best balance between strength and power training and conditioning … the 5/4/3/2/1 training system

CHAPTER FIVE: Training Frequency for Older Lifters … Brooks’ usual weekly training schedule … The unusual reason why Brooks likes to train on weekends … The specific reason why Brooks doesn’t back squat anymore and what he does instead … Joe Mills’ advice

CHAPTER SIX: The Best Exercises for Older Lifters, Part One … Why a few changes need to happen in your exercise choices as you gain experience … A good exercise to drop out of your program … Six examples of the best kind of exercise you can do … Training to preserve neurological function … Cardio Training with weights … Preserving perfect posture … Three exercises to leave out of your program, and which ones you should do instead … Preserving Athleticism and Mobility … How to maximize hormonal activity and the specific exercises that trigger this phenomenon … Ground-based training for older lifters… Where to find a qualified Olympic weightlifting coach in your area … The Miracle Machines and their results

CHAPTER SEVEN: The Best Exercises for Older Lifters, Part Two… The “old standby”… The exercises that most people avoid doing in the gym … Two different “styles” of squatting and advantages and disadvantages of each … How Olympic weightlifters train their legs … Something to avoid if you plan on deadlifting … Benefits of the Gerard Trap Bar and why heavy dumbbells and not an effective substitute … One of Brooks’ absolute favorite exercises and details on performing it in your own training … The truly “old school” exercise for upper body power … John Grimek’s favorite exercises … Combination exercises … Training with blocks

CHAPTER EIGHT: The Role of Auxiliary Exercises … Should you be doing “bodybuilding” exercises? Brooks’ answer may surprise you … Tommy Kono’s training … Three different A/B/C ‘Cardio” weightlifting routines to try

CHAPTER NINE: Unsafe at any age – Exercises to Avoid … The worst offenders of the commonly performed exercises that you’ll see at just about every gym … The truth about Yoga, stability balls, depth jumps, the pec dec machine and many more

CHAPTER TEN: How Heavy Should You Train? … An interesting point from one of the top Master’s weightlifters in the world … One of the common mistakes that most lifters make, according to Tommy Kono … 10 Rules to lift (and live) by for older trainees

CHAPTER ELEVEN: Simple Cycling Programs for Older Lifters … Why “Training Heavy” all the time is a mistake … Three different cycling program listing sets, reps and suggested starting weights, each designed to help you hit new personal records in several different lifts … The influence of job, family and other time constraints … A sixteen-week cycle … Alternating easy weeks and hard weeks … How an older lifter should determine a 1-rep max

CHAPTER TWELVE: Sets, Reps, Weight and the Stabilizing Principle … The absolute worst training mistake that Brooks ever made — and how you can easily avoid making in in your own training… How three sixteen year olds equaled one 47-year old … The 5 x 5 training system … Variations of 5 x 5 training … Reg Park’s Training … 5 x 2 training and cycling

Seen enough and ready to grab your copy of Gray Hair
and Black Iron? Use this button to place your order immediately:

1-800-978-0206

CHAPTER THIRTEEN: How to Warm Up Properly … Something that that many older lifters neglect to do in every workout … The goal of a good workout … Step-by-step instructions … Warming up with a broom stick

CHAPTER FOURTEEN: “Bury Me Big” … Bob Hoffman’s Quick Gain Weight Routine … Hi-Proteen… John Grimek’s example … When to bulk up and when to cut weight

CHAPTER FIFTEEN: Cardio Training for Older Lifters … A simple exercise to get you started … Cardio squats … the 5 x 10 squat program … Cardio Supersets fow whole-body conditioning … Tri-sets and super-sets … Bodyweight conditioning … Using barbells and dumbbells for conditioning work … A complete cardio super-set program … PHA training: advantages and drawbacks … PHA workouts

CHAPTER SIXTEEN: More Cardio Training Ideas … How to use the “fives” technique for building strength, power and cardiovascular fitness … Fred Lowe’s training … Power supersets… Pairing full-range movements with partial movements for interesting results … Twelve ways to combine barbell, dumbbell and heavy, awkward object lifting … Complexes … Breathing Squats and Joseph C. Hise, William Boone, John Grimek, John Davis, Louise Abele and Peary Rader … Five things you should know about breathing squats before you begin … Twenty-Rep Deadlift s… Lugging and Loading Workouts … Conventional Cardio Training … Staying active away from training

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN: Ten Training Programs for Older Lifters Who Use Athletic Style Exercises … The one constant throughout each workout … Programs based on the teachings of Harry Paschall and Bradley J. Steiner … “Cardio Training with Weights” … Abbreviated workouts … 4-Day Upper-Body /Lower Body Split routines … Circuit Training … Workouts for lifters 55 years of age and above

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN: Ten Basic Strength Training Programs for Older Lifters … Workouts for lifters who are interested in strength and power, but who have limited equipment … Which adjustments can be made in each workout

CHAPTER NINETEEN: Ten Total Body Workouts for Older Lifters … Workouts for age 60 and above … How to train hard but not too hard … The classic three-day per week program … Low volume training techniques

CHAPTER TWENTY: Ten Circuit-Training Programs for Older Lifters … Cardio Workouts without cardio machines … Bob Hoffman’s Simplified System of Barbell Training … Where and how to add rope jumping to your training … A program based on Randy Couture’s workout … A six-exercise circuit performed with dumbbells… Sandbag training cardio … Trap Bar Training

CHAPTER TWENTY ONE: Ten Ultra-Abbreviated Programs for Older Lifters … Brief, too the point but VERY effective … Squats, front squats, and Trap Bar routines …

CHAPTER TWENTY TWO: Gut Check Time … Three compelling reasons to get your waist-line in check … Dietary advice for losing bodyfat… How many times per day to eat … Supplements

CHAPTER TWENTY THREE: Core Training for Older Lifters … What core training is and is not … What Brooks stopped doing crunches and what he does instead for abdominal training … Suggestions for heavy ab work

CHAPTER TWENTY FOUR: Protecting Your Joints … Tips on exercise selection … “Cycling” for older lifters … Seven ways to avoid overtraining … When to use ice after a workout … Straight talk on lifting belts, knee wraps, squat suits, bench shirts, knee sleeves, waistbands, sweatsuits and lifting shoes … Suggestions on what to do in case you should get injured … Coming back from an injury

CHAPTER TWENTY FIVE: The Wrap Up

A Treasure Trove of Practical Strength Knowledge

As you can see, the topics that are covered throughout Gray Hair and Black Iron are extensive. Brooks left no stone unturned. We listed the tips and techniques that we found of great interests but there are undoubtedly other gems that you’ll find as you flip through its pages — and this is the type of book that you will flip through very often.  Whether you need a quick workout incorporating just a few barbells and dumbbells, or a more detailed routine to add some poundage to your top bench press, you’ll find more than FIFTY different workouts which run the gamut.  Simply pick the one you need and get to work.

Not JUST for Older Lifters Though…

We’ve listed many pages worth of reasons why Gray Hair and Black Iron should be in every older lifter’s strength library but the fact of the matter is that the advice contained within it is for lifters of any age.  The name of the game here is usable, practical, time-tested training info built on common sense and most importantly of all, results.  The workouts can be performed “as is” or adjusted as needed, either way, this is just the type of information that every lifter should here. 

Too often, lifters spend the second half of their training careers trying to make up for the mistakes they made up in the first half… Gray Hair and Black Iron is the type of book specifically written to help anyone avoide those mistakes in the first place.  Besides, if you don’t need the book right now, the fact of the matter is that you will at some point.

In Stock and Ready to Ship!

If you have read this far, we know you are serious.  In case you can’t wait to get your hands on your personal copy of Gray Hair and Black Iron you should know that we always have several cases on-hand and ready to ship asap.  Orders are generally shipped the same day they are placed or the next available opportunity – the faster we get your books in the mail, the sooner you can start using them to get stronger.

Gray Hair and Black Iron is 310 pages in length and contains the 25 chapters covered in detail above. The book is a 8-1/2-inch by 5-1/2 inch trade paperback with a heavyweight glossy cover. There are no illustrations. All that’s left to do now if for you to take action. You can order your copy online or give us a call any time during normal business hours. Grab your copy today!

Order now!Gray Hair and Black Iron by Brooks Kubik
___________$34.99 plus s/h

Dinosaur Training by Brooks Kubik

Posted on Thursday, September 21st, 2017 by John Wood
~ Lost Secrets of Strength and Development ~
A man who lifted weights for his entire life once took a good look at the world of strength training around him…
…and he didn’t like what he saw … so he did something incredible…

Here’s what happened next:

A gym used to be a serious place for serious people, interested in building serious strength, but in modern times its safe to say that gyms have become glorified juice bars — with no shortage of chrome, ferns, and pencil-neck pseudo experts who wave around plastic dumbbells while making sure their designer headbands matched their suede lifting belts.

This guy… Brooks Kubik. As he trains in his basement gym with a bunch of rusty old weights and oldschool techniques — no chrome or ferns to be found!

Yeah, you know exactly what I’m talking about! Weight training was slowly but surely being taken over by the druggers … the toners … the bros … the poseurs … the pretty boys … the pencil necks … the whiners … the pump artists …the arm-chair experts …and the mirror athletes. (no doubt you’ve seen them all, and this makes you just as sick.)

This man had enough – Enough! His name was Brooks Kubik, and what happened next started a revolution throughout the entire world of strength.

And so it Began

…So Brooks began to write. While Brooks had authored articles in several different publications over the years

(including Milo, Hard Gainer, Iron Master and Iron Man) the words that were now issuing forth on his type writer were somehow different than ever before.

He wrote about the training that had worked for him, how he trained in high school, how he trained in college, how he trained to win multiple National Championships in Bench Press Powerlifting meets, and how his favorite oldtime strongmen used to train…

Brooks had originally planned to type out a fifty or so page manuscript and possibly sell (though more likely give it away) to the few people out in the world he thought might be interested in it. Brooks reached fifty pages after only a few short days of writing, and there was still more material he wanted to cover — a lot more.

Fifty pages turned into a hundred, a hundred pages turned into two hundred. and it didn’t stop there. With the encouragement of several the top people in the strength world, the finished product was titled Dinosaur Training since it was covered training techniques that were almost (but not quite!) extinct.

Dinosaur Training covered the methods that the strongest men who had ever lived had utilized — sure, with traditional weights such as barbells and, but also highly unusual implements such as sandbags, kegs, rocks, anvils, sledge hammers and more. Brooks Kubik went ahead and published Dinosaur Training, releasing it on an unsuspecting world…

And Then Everything Changed
Arthur Saxon — also known as “The Iron Master” — put more weight overhead with one arm than anyone in history, nearly 400 lbs.!
John Davis, multiple-time Olympic weightlifting champion and world record holder, could have just as easily been a champion bodybuilder
Doug Hepburn, the great Canadian champion, was easily one of the strongest men of all time. His workouts are covered in details in ‘Dinosaur Training’.

It was as if the ghosts of Iron Game’s past were suddenly brought back to life… men like Arthur Saxon, John Davis, Reg Park George Hackenschmidt and Steve Stanko became household names again

All of a sudden people started attacked their training with a ferocity that hadn’t been seen for many years. Calloused hands started lifting odd objects again – sand bags, kegs, rocks, anvils, anchors. Training methods such as thick handled weights, heavy partial movements and power rack work all experienced a resurgence in popularity. Suddenly it became OK to lift heavy chunks of iron and steel once again.

Dont’s just train…
Revolution or Evolution?

Less than eighteen months after it appeared, the entire first printing of Dinosaur Training sold out completely … College and NFL strength coaches began reading it and incorporating Old School training techniques into their programs … Everyone started setting up personal gyms in their basements and garages, stocking them with plenty of “old fashioned” equipment that worked better than anything else available.

This wasn’t just a local thing either; orders started flooding in from all over the globe. The strength world had come full circle… once again, people were training like they did in years past — AND building strength like they did in years past.

When it came time for the second printing, Dinosaur Training became even bigger …literally – Brooks added two additional chapters of intense training material. Today, over twenty years after its initial release, Dinosaur Training still stands as one of the all-time great strength books. You would be hard pressed to find a weight training book which has helped more people get the fire back in their belly (or get it going in the first place) when it comes to serious training.

With the treasure trove of solid training information that it contains, it is no wonder that Dinosaur Training and the Dino-Attitude has reached such great heights of popularity. Now you can read and learn from one of the best training books ever published …the book that started a Revolution.

Take a look at all the valuable training information what you will learn within its pages:

The tremendous value of basic exercises …the exercises that MUST be in your program …and which exercises to avoid at all costs (since they are nothing but a waste of your time)

The biggest reason why most of what you read about modern training is unproductive, and THREE simple things you can do turn the ship around if that’s the direction you were headed

What is the Dinosaur challenge? …are you up to it?

7 ways to “Be A Dinosaur” and how to crank the intensity of your workout up a notch or three

The ONE characteristic that all Dinosaurs have in common – find out what it is

3 steps that will make your training more productive – instantly

The #1 reason why most people give up and how you can avoid that like the plague

Think you know the “Best” program?… you’ll be surprised at Brooks’ answer to this one

Brooks Kubik’s favorite strength writers and training tips from the last 100+ years

What an outline of productive training looks like and how to put together your workouts so it’s guaranteed to work

How to train with a water filled barrel or keg, and how that training style nearly put Brooks down for the count

Why hard work is necessary, and how to make sure you are getting the most out of your workout

The 5 reasons people fail according to Dr. Ken Leistner… – probably the most valuable lesson strength training can teach you

What hard work is and is not

2 types of abbreviated training styles that you can use for big gains

The real meaning behind hard work vs. “bunny” training

What the name of the game is… and it’s not what you think

2 approaches to poundage progression, and how to make sure the gains keep coming for a long time

Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced workout routines, laid out step-by-step

Want to know the “secret” of advanced gains? – You’ll be surprised at how simple it really is

How to make progress with multiple sets of low reps

What the 5 x 5 system is, and how Reg Park, Champion strength athlete and bodybuilder, used it to build super strength fifty years ago

How to use “singles” in the most effective manner in your training

Why thick-bars “work” and how to implement them into your workout

How you can make fear work for you instead of against you

10 grip exercises and a dynamite beginners program for future grip masters

6 advanced grip exercises for monster crushing power

How to build real strength with logs, barrels and heavy bags

The many benefits of proper power-rack training

5 hard core power-rack routines

8 fads, fallacies and pitfalls of modern training and how to avoid them all

Much more!!

As you can see, Dinosaur Training covers a lot of ground. Of particular note are three big chapters on grip training which helps anyone lay a solid foundation.

A Crash Course in How to gain Super Strength with
One of the World’s Greatest Teachers

Do you remember the first time you tried to learn something for the first time? Starting out, nothing made sense and you felt like giving up. That’s how it is for a lot of people who want to start lifting weights – they get confused and don’t know what to do – and so they do the only thing they could do, they give up.

Now imagine how confident you felt when someone took the time to explain some things to you. What used to be frustrating, now makes perfect sense and now that you know exactly what to do, it’s off to the races.

That’s exactly how it is when you have Brooks as your teacher. As you turn the pages of Dinosaur Training, all of a sudden all the confusing things about strength training will make sense – you’ll know how many sets to do, you’ll know which exercises to do, you’ll know how much weight to use… and you will begin to build the strength you have always dreamed about.

Get your copy of Dinosaur Training and join the Revolution!

Order now!Dinosaur Training by Brooks Kubik
_________ $19.99 plus s/h

More on the 5 x 5 System

Posted on Sunday, November 20th, 2016 by John Wood
More on the 5 x 5 System
Hi John,

I’ve been using the 5×5 system as my ‘base workout’ for a number of years now.
Whenever things slowed down a bit, I did one (or more) of the following variations.

1.) Reduce the frequency of the workouts. i.e. from 3 times a week to 2, or even
2 workouts one week and just 1 the following week. This was usually enough to spark
continuing progress.


2.) Keep the weight the same on the final working 5th set, but focus on adding reps.
When able to add 2 or 3 more reps with that weight, return to 5×5 and continue
with advancing the weight on that last 5th set.


3.) Take a week off and begin a 5,4,3,2,1 rep scheme with the higher weights this
would allow. Start with 3 workouts per week. When progress slows, I would apply
one (or both) of the above strategies, or return to a straight 5×5 program and
go on from there as before.

These very simple adjustments have kept my progress steadily chugging
along. Using this method I accomplished two main goals that I had set a year ago
in hopes of achieving them by my 65th birthday. One of them was to get my working
set on deadlifts to double bodyweight (360), and my squats over 300 on my 5th set.
I managed to achieve both ahead of schedule by 6 weeks.


I know these poundages don’t mean much compared to younger
and bigger men, but having reachable goals that can be measured from
workout to workout keeps me encouraged and reaping the related benefits.
What I find especially interesting is continuing to make improvements in
performance at an age where I’m also collecting my old age pension.
Geez, whoda thought?


All the Best,


Michael Dumas

Really excellent stuff, Michael. One of the keys to successful training is to always have plenty of options. In this case, when one program goes stale, just switch to the next and keep moving forward, but clearly you are already doing that. Keep it up!

Train hard,
John Wood

P.S. The 5×5 system is the “go to” for a number of strength champions through the years.
Reg Park, for example, used it to win the Mr. Universe title multiple times. You can read more about Reg’s training in his great course Strength and Bulk Training. You’ll also find the 5×5 program discussed in greater detail in several of Brooks Kubik’s books, including “Gray Hair and Black Iron” and “Strength, Muscle and Power.”

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2018 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2018 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.