The Hack Squat

Posted on Wednesday, May 2nd, 2012 by John Wood

Walter Donald Demonstrates the Hack Squat

The Hack Squat, (or Hack Lift, as it is sometimes called) is a behind-the-back deadlift, as demonstrated by famous oldtime physique star Walter Donald in the pages of Super Strength by Alan Calvert.
This movement is not actually named after George Hackenschmidt but gets its name from “Hacke” the German word for ankle, which is roughly where the bar touches before the commencement of the lift. One coaching point on this lift which is not obvious is that the hands are supposed to be touching. Several lifters have been able to perform this movement with nearly 800 pounds.

The Milo Barbell Company Showroom, circa 1915

Posted on Saturday, January 21st, 2012 by John Wood

The Milo Barbell Company, circa 1915

A look at one corner of Alan Calvert’s MILO Barbell Company showroom circa 1915… Globe barbells, dumbbells, and kettlebells as far as the eye can see. That must have been a great place to train… Many performing strongmen of the era commissioned Calvert to make special stage ‘bells for their act.
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

1902 Milo Barbell Company Advertisement

Posted on Sunday, January 8th, 2012 by John Wood

The Milo Barbell Company

In 1902,The Milo Barbell Company, headed by Alan Calvert, opened its doors. Shown here is one of the first advertisements for their wares. Back then the American public had little idea of what a barbell was or how to use one, so Calvert had his work cut out for him. The “system” in question was simply the principle of double progression… which worked great then and works just as effectively a century later.

Also of note is the dumbbell pictured in the ad… Various types of Milo Barbell equipment, dumbbells, barbells, kettlebells etc are quite rare these days but they do turn up on occasion. Only one of these particular shot-loaded dumbbells is currently known to exist, however. The lifter of said dumbbell in this ad is Mr. Frank F. Jones, weightlifting champion of Philadelphia. As noted in the ad, Mr. Jones’ bodyweight at the time was 140 lbs. yet he could lift this dumbbell loaded to 150 lbs. with ease.

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Edward W. Goodman

Posted on Monday, November 21st, 2011 by John Wood

Edward W. Goodman climbs a tree with a 75 lb. kettlebell on each elbow

Edward W. Goodman was a Los Angeles attorney who also liked to lift a few weights… so much so that he became the Amateur Champion of Southern California. Over the course of an afternoon he broke seven of the British amateur lifting records. As shown here, he could also climb a tree with a 75-pound kettlebell hanging from each arm — not a bad feat. Goodman was featured prominently in the literature for Alan Calvert’s MILO Barbell Company since his all of his impressive development came solely from regular barbell training.
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Alan Calvert, Founder of The Milo Barbell Company

Posted on Saturday, September 17th, 2011 by John Wood

Alan Calvert

Back in 1902, Alan Calvert established the Milo Barbell company, which was the first ever strength equipment company on American soil.   Calvert began one of the the very first training publications “Strength” Magazine in 1914, wrote several training books and courses and helped pave the way for thousands of trainees to build size and strength through common sense methods and hard work.
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Super Strength by Alan Calvert

Posted on Tuesday, August 16th, 2011 by John Wood

Super Strength by Alan CalvertSuper Strength by Alan Calvert

A rare magazine advertisement for ‘Super Strength’ by Alan Calvert from 1924 – which would be the same year the book was originally published. Despite the fact that this book was written nearly nine decades ago, the training information is just as effective today.

If you are a serious strength fan, then you should absolutely have a copy in your training library.

(Also of note: the exercises in the ad (and book) were demonstrated by the South African strongman Walter Donald.)

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Eugen Sandow

Posted on Wednesday, June 29th, 2011 by John Wood
Eugen Sandow was the prototypical strongman, the first true strength Superstar and can rightfully be called “The Man who Started it All.”
Strength and How to Obtain It by Eugen Sandow
Sandow thrilled audiences all over the world with his classical physique as well as his amazing feats of strength. In fact, many of the most famous Iron Game luminaries such as George Jowett and Alan Calvert (among others) were inspired to begin training after seeing Sandow in action.

Once he tired of the performing life, Sandow established the very first “Health Studios,” mail order training courses, mail order training equipment and physical culture magazine — all “firsts” for things which are now commonplace in the modern age.