Continental Lifting

Posted on Monday, August 13th, 2018 by John Wood
‘Continental’ is a style of lifting where the bar is taken from the ground to the shoulders in any manner possible – usually in 2-3 separate movements.

The most common style is with the aid of a belt with a large buckle that which the lifter rests the loaded bar on before taking it up to the racked position for the press or jerk. Weightlifting Champion Norb Schemansky is shown here continentaling this barbell in order to train with a much heavier weight than he could have normally used.

The “short pull” from the belt builds strength in the ‘second pull’ in the Olympic lifts. It was this type of power training with maximum weights which contributed greatly to Norb’s success as a lifter..

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

The Dellinger FIles

Posted on Tuesday, February 20th, 2018 by John Wood

Rock Solid Training Information and Iron Game Memories from the man that lived it…
By now you should be familiar with the name Jan Dellinger… but if you aren’t, he worked for the York Barbell Company for over 25 years — where he was Bob Hoffman’s right hand man, assistant editor of Muscular Development Magazine, and even shared an office with strength legend John Grimek for a number of years. He’s caught more than a few workouts with past Mr. Americas, written dozens of training articles for several major publications and sold more quality barbells than you could shake a stick at.

Well I’ve known Jan for a long time and we have been corresponding by email for the last few years now. Over the course of our conversations he would often write up some interesting story which he saw or was a part of while he worked at York. Jan had also been watching the website with great interest and a few of the topics I have written about got his creative fires going.

You want to talk strength history? Jan was there…

Last fall Jan asked if he could write up a training article or two that might be posted on the website. Of course I agreed and a few days later Jan sent something over… It was a detailed article on sandbag training.

Jan had also mentioned that he had a few other topics that he would like to cover, and, remembering the material he had written from our correspondences,I suggested that I would be delighted to collect this material into book form. I told Jan to just go wild and write about anything that he saw fit.

As I mentioned earlier, Jan has seen a lot of things over his time at York Barbell, and has been training since he was in junior high himself so he knows his way around a barbell…

We took a look at what we had, narrowed it down to a hundred and twenty five pages and dubbed it “The Dellinger Files Vol.I” (I say “Volume I” because there we have several hundred more pages of material and memories from Jan and there will be subsequent volumes)

For the time being though, Volume I is now ready to roll, and once it was all said and done it turned out even better than expected.

Take a Look Inside Volume I…

By now you’re probably dying to find out what exactly you’ll find in “The Dellinger Files volume I.” As I mentioned above, we combined some of Jan’s “Muscletown Memories” with training articles and alternated the two throughout the book. Take a look at some of the topics covered in volume I:

  • Where it All Began… How Jan started working at York Barbell and Grimek’s unique interview” process… what it was like editing Muscular Development Magazine and sharing an office with John Grimek… how Jan met Dr. Ken Leistner… adventures through the strength world, NFL weight rooms, lifting championships… and much more!
  • How to buy an Olympic Barbell… Why “saving a buck” is generally not a good idea… How long you should expect your bar to last… Exercises you should never do with a good Olympic bar… Where the money goes in the price of a quality bar… What the markings on your bar mean… The main differences between an “Olympic Lifting” Barbell and a Powerlifting Barbell…
  • Tips for lifting contests…
  • The Bruno Course… The best training course Jan has ever seen in all his years in the strength business… and it’s probably not what you might think…
  • Sandbag Training Tips… Jan’s introduction to “sandbag training,” why he was apprehensive at first, and what changed his mind… Three different methods for training with sandbags… How sandbags compare to barbells and dumbbells… How to structure a sandbag workout… Sandbag conditioning work… “PHA” sandbag training… How to combine sandbags with barbell training
  • Sergio Takes a Nap… What happened at the 1983 Ms. America bodybuilding contest and how Sergio Oliva lived up to his nickname “The Myth”
  • Two of the Very Best Bodyweight Training Exercises… what they are and which bodybuilding, legends used them to build their champion physiques…
  • Sled Pulling Tutorial… Get ready for some pretty strange looks from the neighbors… putting your “pulling” routine together… sled pulling for strength and conditioning… Dr. Ken’s influence… how-to’s, progression tips and goal
  • Behind the scenes at York Barbell… Who are celebrities who have shown up (some announced, some unannounced) at York… and what happens when they do?
  • A Different Kind of Road Work… Ever wanted to learn the finer points of car pushing? Now you can find out for yourself…
  • Range Training… How to use this unusual method of progression to build strength and move past sticking points…
  • Bodyweight Training… How a life-long barbell man makes it work… Goals, training tips and workout ideas… Where bodyweight training “fits” into a routine…
  • Negative Training… For Chins, how Robert Francis trained to win the Chinup contest at the 1998 York Barbell picnic…progression methods… how much you really need
  • Ed Jubinville’s Muscle Control Act… You won’t believe what happened, luckily someone was there to see it live…
  • One-Arm Deadlift Training Tips… find out more about this little used but highly effective grip and forearm exercise
  • The Partial Trap Bar Deadlift… A good substitute for The Jefferson Lift? You be the judge
  • Sample Workouts and Training Tips… above and beyond what is discussed in each training chapter

You want York Barbell history? — It’s in there. You want sandbag training? — It’s in there. You want grip training advice? — It’s in there….

As you can see, basic, straightforward, and to the point… great training information combined with strength memories that you will not find anywhere else… All the ingredients for a classic strength book — and what will be the first of many. Whether powerlifter, bodybuilder, garage lifter, beginner, veteran, or strength history buff, this is a title that should be in your personal library…

20 Chapters, 8-1/2″ x 11″ Size, over 51,000 Words, Sample workouts, Recommended Reading List, Glossy Cover, Printed on heavy weight paper, No pictures. The Dellinger Files Volume I is in stock and ready for immediate shipment. Get your copy today!

Order now!The Dellinger Files Vol 1. by Jan Dellinger
_________ $29.99 plus s/h

The Arthur Saxon Collection

Posted on Friday, September 15th, 2017 by John Wood
Arthur Saxon, The Iron Master
Arthur Saxon, The Iron Master
The ONLY Man to lift 371 pounds overhead with one arm… now you too can learn the training Secrets of the IRON MASTER

How many men in the history of the World can say they ever put over 370 Pounds overhead with one arm? I don’t know for sure, but the answer is undoubtedly “not many.” In fact, I know of only one: Arthur Saxon, “The Iron Master” …the man whose records will never be equaled or surpassed…

If you’re into training, I’m sure you have always wonders how such a man as Arthur Saxon became so strong… but what if you had a time machine and could go back and talk to the man himself You could ask him exactly how he trained… what he ate… his views on strength… his favorite exercises… what his routine looked like… and what it felt like to lift 350+ pounds overhead with one hand.

Though time travel isn’t currently an option, you can still find out all that and more directly from Arthur Saxon through his two excellent training books: The Development of Physical Power and The Textbook of Weight-Lifting — and they are every bit as useful today as they were the day they were written, well over a century ago! These two classic courses, penned by one of the strongest men in recorded history, are now available once again in high quality modern reprint format:

The Development of Physical Power
Written in 1906, The Development of Physical Power in the first of Arthur Saxon’s two training books. In it, Saxon covers a variety of topics:

The meaning of the book’s title… What Saxon looks for beyond the muscles… How his early days contributed to his great strength later in life… Saxon’s international matches and challenges against other strongmen… His ideas on real strength… His views on light exercise… Weight-lifting for other sports, wrestling, boxing etc… Weight in relation to lifting… Notes on muscular measurements… How the strength of a man is often indicated by the thickness of his wrists…

Details of Saxon’s typical routine… Which types of lifts you should include in every workout… What an advanced lifter should do when he trains… The value of competition… The best question to ask about over-training… Nutrition information for the would-be strongman… The best place to train… One of the secrets to Saxon’s success…

What it feels like to lift 350 lbs. with one hand… The only thought that should be in your head when going for a record lift… Notes on the performance the bent-press… How to perform the One-Hand Snatch… The Single-Handed Dumb-bell Swing… Two-Dumb-bell lifting… Notes on Ring and ball (kettlebell) lifting… Measurements and record lifts… Measurements of Hermann and Kurt Saxon… Saxon’s open challenge to the world!

An eye witness account by famous physical culture authority Thomas Inch, which substantiates Saxon’s claims, rounds out the book. The photos on the front and back cover plus 45 rare photos and illustrations contained therein are more than worth the price of this beautiful 5-inch x 7-inch trade paperback with 122 pages. This is a unique look into the training and philosophy of one of the strongest men who ever lived whose methods you can incorporate into your own training.

The Textbook of Weight-Lifting
The Textbook of Weight-Lifting was written a few years later as part of a series of “Textbooks” on various sports and athletic events and offers an even deeper look into Arthur Saxon’s training techniques.  Saxon’s second training course is filled with many rare and never-before-published photos of the Iron Master in action – he personally posed for each photograph. Here’s a look at the topics covered:

Why everyone should lift weights… The test of strength… “Skill” in relation to weight-lifting… Real strength vs. possibilities… Choice of exercises… The difference between Continental and “Clean” lifting… The best exercises for competition lifting… One and two-handed Bar-Bell Lifts… The first thing you should do when training the Clean… The Clean Press from the shoulder… How to “Lock” the shoulder… Tips and techniques on the one-handed jerk from the shoulder…

The correct path that the bar should take… The two-dumb-bell clean… The dumb-bell swing… Four things you need to know about performing the snatch… The best “all-around” lift: bent-press…The two-handed bar-bell push… Records set by the German lifter Josef Steinbach… Ring, Ball and Square Weight-lifting… Records set by the French lifting champion Jean Francois LeBreton… Weight-lifting Exercises vs. Exercises with Weights… Several Kettlebell exercises for forearm development… Mental “tricks” to use for lifting more weight… Exhibition and Trick Weight-Lifting Feats…

The Textbook of Weight-Lifting was originally published in 1910… The modern reprint edition is 5-inches x 7-inches in size and 85 pages in length.  There are also 30 rare photographs of Arthur Saxon in action demonstrating the lifts and techniques discussed in the text. “Textbook” makes a worthy sequel to Saxon’s first book and an excellent addition to your training library.

A Blast from the Past… and a Look Toward the Future

Despite having been written over a century ago, Saxon’s writing’s are amazingly relevant to today’s lifters. His descriptions and tips on the oldtime lifts etc are, of course, top notch, but it is his advice on the other factors of lifting success are the real value to these courses. Saxon weighs in on such topics as proper diet, how often to train, “specificity,” the value of lifting for athletes, balanced development, the proper application of lifting and conditioning work for true athletic development, and mental training techniques… all concepts which were amazingly ahead of their time.

We are also talking about a man who routinely lifted more weight with one arm than most lifters — oldtime or modern — could lift with two, and this is a unique opportunity to learn the details of his exact approach. Saxon’s routines are not complicated and his advice is extremely practical which are two lessons that should not be lost on modern trainees. If you are looking to build your strength and power, you certainly can’t go wrong studying the methods and insight of one of the strongest men who ever lived.

Order now!The Arthur Saxon Collection (2 books):
_________ $29.99 plus s/h