Young Alan Calvert

Posted on Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017 by John Wood
Alan Calvert, founder of The Milo Barbell Company, was a prolific strength author who wrote an untild number of courses and articles. He rarely featured himself though, but this is an exception: a rare image of a young Alan Calvert in mid-swing with an excellent Milo globe dumbbell. This would be circa 1902. Dig those gladiator boots!
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Swingin’ With Saxon

Posted on Wednesday, September 17th, 2014 by John Wood

“The Swing” is mentioned in several modern courses, but it was a performed in a much different manner back in Arthur Saxon’s day. Here are his instructions for performing the lift:

“The muscles called into play are practically the same here as in the one-handed snatch, but the bell must be placed on end between the feet as shown in illustration. Keep the head down, then, with a perfectly straight arm, pull up, using a combination of muscular efforts and concentration as described in the snatch lift. Lean back and watch the dumb-bell with your eyes, and when it is at suitable height suddenly dip beneath same and twist your wrist violently, so that you may place a straight arm beneath the bell.”

-from The Development of Physical Power,
Chapter 15
(written in 1906)

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Ron Walker

Posted on Thursday, June 5th, 2014 by John Wood

Ron Walker

Shown here is the great British weightlifter Ron Walker, who lifted in the heavyweight class although he never weighed much more than 195 pounds. Over the course of his career, Walker set 21 British lifting records, many of which still stand!

A few of these records include:

  • Right Hand Snatch: 91kg, set August 6, 1933
  • Left Hand Snatch: 92kg , set August 24, 1937
  • Right Hand Dumbbell Swing: 86½kg, set January 25, 1937
  • Left Hand Dumbbell Swing: 77½kg, set September 13, 1934
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Jean Francois LeBreton

Posted on Thursday, December 26th, 2013 by John Wood

Jean Francois LeBreton was the lightweight lifting champion of France in the early 1900’s. One of his greatest lifts was a one-arm dumbbell swing of 200 pounds which was made at a bodyweight of 200 pounds. — An achievement which puts him among the strongest of all time in this lift.
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Jean Francois LeBreton

Posted on Monday, November 14th, 2011 by John Wood

French Strongman Jean Francois LeBreton lifts a Globe Dumbbell overhead

Jean Francois LeBreton was the lightweight lifting champion of France in the early 1900’s. One of his greatest lifts was a one-arm dumbbell swing of 200 pounds which was made at a body weight of 200 pounds… an achievement which puts him among the strongest of all time in this lift.

Maxick

Posted on Friday, August 19th, 2011 by John Wood

He began his life with the unfortunate name of “Max Sick” and it was certainly fitting as he suffered with a variety of ailments. As a young man he was introduced to physical training as a method for improving his condition. Using isometrics, hand balancing and weightlifting he built himself back to health and later became reborn as “Maxick” champion Strength athlete.

One day, while working as an artists model he noticed that he was able to isolate his abdominals in a certain way while he held a specific pose for periods of time. As time passed, he began to experiment with isolating other muscle groups and the unique art of “Muscle Control” was born.

The audiences of the time had never seen anything like it. It was not only quite a sight but Maxick himself used primarily Muscle Control to build an incredible physique. Though he rarely lifted weights, Maxick was incredibly strong, at a body weight of around 150 pounds, he could perform the following:

  • Two hands military press with barbell: 230 lbs.
  • Right hand military press: 112 lbs.
  • Right hand snatch with barbell: 165 lbs. 
  • Right hand swing with dumbbell: 150 lbs. 
  • Two hands clean and jerk with barbell: 272 lbs.

Due to the unique benefits and training effects of practicing muscle control, many physique stars and physical culturists practiced it including: Otto Arco, Alan P. Mead, John Grimek and Ed Jubinville.