Sled Pushing

Posted on Tuesday, July 24th, 2018 by John Wood
Oldtime football players used to push wooden sleds to build leg strength and stamina. This was good for conditioning although not so much for football technique — either way, it’s a great workout. This picture shows the Harvard football team training circa 1910. Sleds like these are actually still made for training purposes although if you don’t have one, you can always push a car for a similar effect.

Dinosaur Training by Brooks Kubik

Posted on Thursday, September 21st, 2017 by John Wood
~ Lost Secrets of Strength and Development ~
A man who lifted weights for his entire life once took a good look at the world of strength training around him…
…and he didn’t like what he saw … so he did something incredible…

Here’s what happened next:

A gym used to be a serious place for serious people, interested in building serious strength, but in modern times its safe to say that gyms have become glorified juice bars — with no shortage of chrome, ferns, and pencil-neck pseudo experts who wave around plastic dumbbells while making sure their designer headbands matched their suede lifting belts.

This guy… Brooks Kubik. As he trains in his basement gym with a bunch of rusty old weights and oldschool techniques — no chrome or ferns to be found!

Yeah, you know exactly what I’m talking about! Weight training was slowly but surely being taken over by the druggers … the toners … the bros … the poseurs … the pretty boys … the pencil necks … the whiners … the pump artists …the arm-chair experts …and the mirror athletes. (no doubt you’ve seen them all, and this makes you just as sick.)

This man had enough – Enough! His name was Brooks Kubik, and what happened next started a revolution throughout the entire world of strength.

And so it Began

…So Brooks began to write. While Brooks had authored articles in several different publications over the years

(including Milo, Hard Gainer, Iron Master and Iron Man) the words that were now issuing forth on his type writer were somehow different than ever before.

He wrote about the training that had worked for him, how he trained in high school, how he trained in college, how he trained to win multiple National Championships in Bench Press Powerlifting meets, and how his favorite oldtime strongmen used to train…

Brooks had originally planned to type out a fifty or so page manuscript and possibly sell (though more likely give it away) to the few people out in the world he thought might be interested in it. Brooks reached fifty pages after only a few short days of writing, and there was still more material he wanted to cover — a lot more.

Fifty pages turned into a hundred, a hundred pages turned into two hundred. and it didn’t stop there. With the encouragement of several the top people in the strength world, the finished product was titled Dinosaur Training since it was covered training techniques that were almost (but not quite!) extinct.

Dinosaur Training covered the methods that the strongest men who had ever lived had utilized — sure, with traditional weights such as barbells and, but also highly unusual implements such as sandbags, kegs, rocks, anvils, sledge hammers and more. Brooks Kubik went ahead and published Dinosaur Training, releasing it on an unsuspecting world…

And Then Everything Changed
Arthur Saxon — also known as “The Iron Master” — put more weight overhead with one arm than anyone in history, nearly 400 lbs.!
John Davis, multiple-time Olympic weightlifting champion and world record holder, could have just as easily been a champion bodybuilder
Doug Hepburn, the great Canadian champion, was easily one of the strongest men of all time. His workouts are covered in details in ‘Dinosaur Training’.

It was as if the ghosts of Iron Game’s past were suddenly brought back to life… men like Arthur Saxon, John Davis, Reg Park George Hackenschmidt and Steve Stanko became household names again

All of a sudden people started attacked their training with a ferocity that hadn’t been seen for many years. Calloused hands started lifting odd objects again – sand bags, kegs, rocks, anvils, anchors. Training methods such as thick handled weights, heavy partial movements and power rack work all experienced a resurgence in popularity. Suddenly it became OK to lift heavy chunks of iron and steel once again.

Dont’s just train…
Revolution or Evolution?

Less than eighteen months after it appeared, the entire first printing of Dinosaur Training sold out completely … College and NFL strength coaches began reading it and incorporating Old School training techniques into their programs … Everyone started setting up personal gyms in their basements and garages, stocking them with plenty of “old fashioned” equipment that worked better than anything else available.

This wasn’t just a local thing either; orders started flooding in from all over the globe. The strength world had come full circle… once again, people were training like they did in years past — AND building strength like they did in years past.

When it came time for the second printing, Dinosaur Training became even bigger …literally – Brooks added two additional chapters of intense training material. Today, over twenty years after its initial release, Dinosaur Training still stands as one of the all-time great strength books. You would be hard pressed to find a weight training book which has helped more people get the fire back in their belly (or get it going in the first place) when it comes to serious training.

With the treasure trove of solid training information that it contains, it is no wonder that Dinosaur Training and the Dino-Attitude has reached such great heights of popularity. Now you can read and learn from one of the best training books ever published …the book that started a Revolution.

Take a look at all the valuable training information what you will learn within its pages:

The tremendous value of basic exercises …the exercises that MUST be in your program …and which exercises to avoid at all costs (since they are nothing but a waste of your time)

The biggest reason why most of what you read about modern training is unproductive, and THREE simple things you can do turn the ship around if that’s the direction you were headed

What is the Dinosaur challenge? …are you up to it?

7 ways to “Be A Dinosaur” and how to crank the intensity of your workout up a notch or three

The ONE characteristic that all Dinosaurs have in common – find out what it is

3 steps that will make your training more productive – instantly

The #1 reason why most people give up and how you can avoid that like the plague

Think you know the “Best” program?… you’ll be surprised at Brooks’ answer to this one

Brooks Kubik’s favorite strength writers and training tips from the last 100+ years

What an outline of productive training looks like and how to put together your workouts so it’s guaranteed to work

How to train with a water filled barrel or keg, and how that training style nearly put Brooks down for the count

Why hard work is necessary, and how to make sure you are getting the most out of your workout

The 5 reasons people fail according to Dr. Ken Leistner… – probably the most valuable lesson strength training can teach you

What hard work is and is not

2 types of abbreviated training styles that you can use for big gains

The real meaning behind hard work vs. “bunny” training

What the name of the game is… and it’s not what you think

2 approaches to poundage progression, and how to make sure the gains keep coming for a long time

Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced workout routines, laid out step-by-step

Want to know the “secret” of advanced gains? – You’ll be surprised at how simple it really is

How to make progress with multiple sets of low reps

What the 5 x 5 system is, and how Reg Park, Champion strength athlete and bodybuilder, used it to build super strength fifty years ago

How to use “singles” in the most effective manner in your training

Why thick-bars “work” and how to implement them into your workout

How you can make fear work for you instead of against you

10 grip exercises and a dynamite beginners program for future grip masters

6 advanced grip exercises for monster crushing power

How to build real strength with logs, barrels and heavy bags

The many benefits of proper power-rack training

5 hard core power-rack routines

8 fads, fallacies and pitfalls of modern training and how to avoid them all

Much more!!

As you can see, Dinosaur Training covers a lot of ground. Of particular note are three big chapters on grip training which helps anyone lay a solid foundation.

A Crash Course in How to gain Super Strength with
One of the World’s Greatest Teachers

Do you remember the first time you tried to learn something for the first time? Starting out, nothing made sense and you felt like giving up. That’s how it is for a lot of people who want to start lifting weights – they get confused and don’t know what to do – and so they do the only thing they could do, they give up.

Now imagine how confident you felt when someone took the time to explain some things to you. What used to be frustrating, now makes perfect sense and now that you know exactly what to do, it’s off to the races.

That’s exactly how it is when you have Brooks as your teacher. As you turn the pages of Dinosaur Training, all of a sudden all the confusing things about strength training will make sense – you’ll know how many sets to do, you’ll know which exercises to do, you’ll know how much weight to use… and you will begin to build the strength you have always dreamed about.

Get your copy of Dinosaur Training and join the Revolution!

Order now!Dinosaur Training by Brooks Kubik
_________ $19.99 plus s/h

The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results by Ellington Darden

Posted on Wednesday, September 28th, 2016 by John Wood
The NEW Bodybuilding
for Old-School Results
Eliminate confusion, develop confidence and gain bigger and stronger muscles – faster than ever before!
Arthur Jones, feeding one of his baby elephants. Note the machine gun with a banana clip – this guy means business.

The man looked like the Devil himself and then threatened to kill me less than 20 minutes after we met…

He lunged at me but I was too quick and dodged his advance but then with a quick move he grabbed me by the scruff of the neck…

“Look kid, the smartest and toughest men in the world have mustaches … I have one and your dad doesn’t!”… but I broke free from his grasp … then like a cat I jumped up on the windowsill, sprang through the air and got him right in his bad shoulder with a flying drop-kick…

So went my introduction to Arthur Jones and probably the only fight that Arthur ever lost … I was six years old at the time.

Arthur Jones was the roughest, toughest, meanest and smartest Iron Game pioneer who ever walked the Earth and the man who revolutionized strength training forever. His ideas influenced millions of people to start training in the most effective manner possible. Now these same ideas will help YOU build TWICE the strength in HALF the time.

Fast Forward A Decade…

Here, read this,” said my Dad as he handed me a thick folder full of Xeroxed sheets of paper.

I was fifteen years old — just a freshman in high school — and starting to get into strength training in a serious way. I was looking for the best way to get as big and as strong as I possibly could for the next football season.

So I took the folder and, without looking too closely at it, noticed that it contained a series of training articles written by Arthur Jones; a name I vaguely recalled from the past.

This was a lot of material to go through and I originally intended to throw it in some forgotten corner of my room and get around to it when I had more time (probably never). The thing is, as I walked up to my room, I took a closer look at what was really inside and when I saw the first few pages, I stopped in my tracks… I couldn’t take another step.

I knew instantly that this was information that I had to read RIGHT NOW. I took a seat right there at the top of the stairs and began to read…

Understand, I had seen books on strength training — lots of them. I had seen plenty of training courses too, and a fair share of “muscle comics.” They were all pretty much the same … what I was reading right then was a whole different animal. Those articles were like nothing I had ever seen before. A few hours went by but it only felt like a few minutes as I made my way through the material. I read everything.

When I got done, I felt 10 feet tall, like I had found diamonds as big as basketballs in my own backyard. No more confusion – I now possessed the keys to super strength.

That day my life (and my training) changed forever.

Strength training had never been explained to me this way before. Many of the things about strength training that I had previously been confused about now made perfect sense. Arthur Jones’ ideas gave me a clear picture of exactly what I needed to do and exactly how I needed to do it in order to get stronger.

Within those pages, I learned the foundations (almost a step-by-step blueprint) for understanding the fundamental building-blocks of Strength development. All that was left was to do it, and now I had the Confidence to know I was on the right path.

Dr. Darden Strikes Again!
Dr. Ellington Darden

Many people had the same experience when they first read some of Arthur’s materials.

Over four decades ago, when Arthur Jones unleashed his training philosophy on an unsuspecting world, it soon spread like wildfire. It made a heck of a lot of sense to thousands upon thousands of trainees all over the country and the world, and in practice, worked better than anything else than they ever tried.

Among the many people who achieved tremendous results were Ellington Darden, a Champion Bodybuilder and Ph.D. who not only had many published training articles under his belt, but graced the cover of many strength magazines of the time.

Ellington Darden got his hands on all of Arthur Jones’ articles and liked what he read.  Darden eventually trained under Arthur Jones and ended up achieving the best results he had ever experienced — Darden was a previous collegiate Mr. America contest winner, so this was really saying something. Training with Arthur Jones had such a big impact that Ellington Darden has been writing about it ever since. Dr. Darden has the unique distinction of being there throughout the entire Nautilus phenomenon so he can definitely tell you the real deal.

Today, with nearly 50 books to his credit on a variety of subjects, now Dr. Darden takes it back to where it all began in this modern classic…

Enter: The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results
by Ellington Darden, Ph.D.

Was Arthur Jones a Genius… Or a Madman?

There might be a pretty good case for him being both. Imagine stepping into a time machine to see and hear from the people who were actually there to learn the real story behind Nautilus, Arthur Jones and the whole ball of wax – Now you can!

Casey Viator (Pictured) was Arthur’s top student and, at 19 years old, the youngest Mr. America winner in history, you’ll be able to read an interview all about Casey’s life and his training starting on page 124.

At over 300 pages,”New Bodybuilding” is part history lesson, part training guide and one thing is for sure: there has never been anything like it before in the world of strength training. This book would be a valuable addition to your Strength library for just the Golden Age photos alone.: we’re talking hundreds of classic shots.

Here is just a sample of the things you will find in its pages:

10 Classic Interviews with the top individuals in the strength industry

Hear the real story from the men who lived it:

Kim Wood – Hall of Fame Strength Coach and Strength Legend

Ben Sorenson – Manager of Vic Tanny’s famous gym in Santa Monica (near Muscle Beach) from 1947-1949 and Arthur’s first training partner

Jim Flanagan – Arthur’s right hand man who reminisces about Milo Steinborn, the last of the oldtime strongmen; Jim describes what it was like to train in Steinborn’s Gym.

Casey Viator – The youngest Mr. America ever and Arthur’s top student. Read what Casey recalls about his most grueling exercise sessions with Arthur.

Roger Schwab – Owner of Mainline Nautilus, Philadelphia, PA, behind-the-scenes Strength Legend and REAL Trainer of Champions

Joe Mullen – Iron Game Veteran who teaches you the secrets of the one arm chin-up

Boyer Coe – Champion Bodybuilder: Mr. America 1969, Mr. Universe 1969,

Dan Riley – 25 year NFL Strength coach Veteran, holder of three Superbowl Rings (Including 3 Football Specific Training Routines)

Werner Kieser – Old School Intensity from Germany

Wes Brown – “Pumping Iron and Nautilus” – How Arnold Trained during his most famous film

Andy McCutcheon – HIT enthusiast from England, who outlines how he was able to break the British record for pushups (doing 107 in 60 seconds), and his training with Multiple Mr. Olympia Winner Dorian Yates.

  • Intensity vs. Form: Which is more important? – and the reasons you should know why
  • The Real meaning of “Old School” Training – Which probably isn’t what you think it is..
  • A look into the Past – Muscle Beach, the modern Muscle Mecca where Arthur began serious training at Vic Tanny’s Gym
  • How Kim Wood knew about Arthur Jones well over a decade before he met him in person and well before his Nautilus days
  • The real story behind the first appearance of “The Blue Monster” – Culver City, California 1970
  • The truth about Kim Wood’s unique “200 Reps” Routine
  • The most important goal for any football-strength related program and why most football training routines are worthless
  • What made Cincinnati Bengals Nose Tackle Tim Krumrie stand out above just about every football player who ever lived? – Check out his brief 4-set training routine
  • Boyer Coe’s “unvarnished” Championship Bicep and Tricep Routine, which only requires simple equipment that can be found in every gym
  • The 7 most important tips for getting the best results from any arm program Think you need to train for hours? – WRONG! wait until you find out just how long a proper arm development routine should take
  • The amazing influence of Confidence in your training program and how to use it to your best advantage
  • 6 Step-by-Step tips to the perfect pushup and 5 steps to performing proper negative-pushups
  • The single set vs. multiple set debate, now settled once and for all
  • The Best of the Bulletins – The collected wit and Wisdom of Arthur Jones
  • The 18 different signs of overtraining and 10 different ways to guard against them
  • Repetition Ranges: Low, Medium, High – Which is Best?
  • The value of negative-only training and how to do it correctly A simple test to help you know your optimum rep range
  • 9 “Beyond Failure” Techniques to stimulate maximum muscle growth
  • Just what was “The Happiness Machine” and Why just one workout on it would wreck your whole week
  • How to correctly perform Negative-only chin-ups and 2 different negative-chin-up routines
  • How Motor Learning Helps Strength Training: Stable Answers for Shaky Practices
  • The 3 types of motor “transfer” and what you have to know about each one
  • Metabolic Conditioning – What it is and why you need to know about it
  • How to perform Metabolic Conditioning workouts with Machines or with barbells
  • 7 Training “Rules” and why your workout won’t “work” without them

  • The precision workout chart and the best way to measure your progress
  • 3 reasons why split routines MAY or MAY NOT be right for you.
  • Find out what happened the time when Arthur Jones trained Legendary wrestler Dan Gable
A Unique Glimpse Into The Iron Game’s Past:
What was Old is New Again
The great Steve Reeves – some VERY interesting and little-known details of his training are revealed in chapter I
Milo Steinborn settled in Florida when his wrestling career ended and mentored a young Jim Flanagan, details are in chapter 11
Warren Lincoln Travis, the legendary strongman, still has few things to teach you about strength training a century later…

The truth is you can only look as far forward as you can see into the past. What if you could be a fly on the wall and listen in on how some of the strongest men of all time trained?

How about a look at their unique training equipment?

In The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results you will learn about many interesting things from the Golden Age of Strength training – the men and the methods that paved the foundations for today…

Take a journey back to the Turn of the Century with Oldtime Strongman Warren Lincoln Travis, or strength star Henry “Milo” Steinborn (who owned and ran the first commercial gym in America.)

Go back to the sands of the original Muscle Beach in Santa Monica, California circa 1948 and learn how bodybuilding legend Steve Reeves used to train at Vic Tanny’s Gym. You’ll also learn about many more Iron Game greats: John Grimek, George Eiferman, Marvin Eder, Freddy Ortiz… Casey Viator, Sergio Oliva, Boyer Coe, Mike & Ray Mentzer… the list goes on and on!

How’s This for Old-School Strength?

Here I am doing a few wrist curls with an antique dumbbell that once belonged to the French Strongman, Apollon (Yes, that Apollon), from chapter 30, (which I helped write): Iron-Vise Grip Strength: A Fistful of Power. Find out more on page 272.

You Want Training Routines?

Most training courses provide plenty of “theory” but little that you can actually do. The New Bodybuilding for Old School Results doesn’t just provide a ton of workouts for you to try but gives you the very Best workouts – the exact workouts – that have been used successfully again and again for decades. Get the book, read it, and 10 minutes later you’ll be able use the same workout that the champs do:

Try these out for size:

The Classic Nautilus Machine Circuit from 1975

The Nautilus Negative-Only Routine

HIT (High Intensity Training) A-B Foundational Routine

HIT Thigh Emphasis Routine

HIT Mid-section Emphasis Routine

HIT Change of Pace Routine

HIT Overall Body Routine

HIT Back-Chest Emphasis Routine

The 5 “Core” Movements Routine

HIT Abbreviated Routine

HIT A-B-C Arm Specialization Routine

HIT A-B Basic Routine

The BIG Routine

The 3-Day Split

The 4 Day Contra-Lateral Split

2 different negative-chin-up routines

6 Cadence Variations

8 Ways to Specialize on Calves with the most productive calf cycle ever created

Rediscover the lost art of rib-cage development/Chest Expansion

How to stretch, breathe, and contract during the recommended exercises

The “Shoulders for Soldiers” Deltoid Routine

The “Fistful of Power” Iron-Vise Grip Routine

Not Just for Bodybuilders But
ALL Strength Athletes

One of the biggest reasons for failure among many trainees is that they never fully learned how to train in the first place. They have no clue as to why certain exercises should be done in certain ways — and the results, if there are any, are often mediocre at best.

The truth is that every person in the world is essentially the same in some very fundamental ways – and every person in this world gains strength through the same processes. The principles outlined in this book will help you understand these processes which will allow your to become super strong, no matter what you are training for and no matter what equipment you are using.

As you can see, The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results by Ellington Darden Ph.D. is chocked full of valuable information. There is enough here to point anyone in the right direction for Super Strength – 300+ pages, over 40 training routines, hundreds of pictures, interviews with All-Time Iron Game Legends and more!!

Order now!The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results by Ellington Darden:
___________$39.99 plus s/h

The Gittleson Dumbbell

Posted on Friday, May 9th, 2014 by John Wood

The Gittleson Dumbbell

The ‘Gittleson Dumbbell’ is so named because it sat on my college strength coach Mike Gittleson’s desk for all the years that I was at Michigan, and likely at least a decade before that. (Mike was the University of Michigan’s football strength coach for 30 years and produced more All-Americans and NFL Draft picks than any other college strength coach in history.)

As you can see this unforgiving chunk of iron weighs 120 pounds. I’ve bent pressed it, snatched it but not yet strictly overhead pressed it ~ something I am on track to do soon…

Neck Training

Posted on Friday, March 21st, 2014 by John Wood

Rick Redman Neck Training

To say a larger, stronger neck is important in playing the game of football would be an understatement…so it’s curious why neck training is often left out of many modern programs. At least a few people “get it” though. Here’s College Football Hall of Famer Rick Redman working on his neck development in an interesting way back in 1963 while playing for the University of Washington.

Warren Moon on the Double Shoulder

Posted on Friday, February 22nd, 2013 by John Wood

Warren Moon trains on a Nautilus Double Shoulder machine

Warren Moon, circa 1976, then a junior at the University of Washington, getting in a workout on a Nautilus double shoulder machine. Despite training on machines, Moon somehow still went on to become one of the greatest quarterbacks of all time.

Kevin Tolbert

Posted on Wednesday, December 19th, 2012 by John Wood

Kevin Tolbert

What does the result of high intensity training look like? Check out Kevin Tolbert above. Kevin was certainly blessed on one level, but also keep in mind that he never bothered with “secret” exercises, just basic workouts, plenty of effort and no excuses. Kevin’s exact training programs are outlined in The Steel Tip Collection. Kevin was just recently announced as the new football strength coach at the University of Michigan.
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2018 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2018 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

The Neck Helmet

Posted on Monday, March 19th, 2012 by John Wood

The Neck Helmet

If you want to look strong (not to mention also be strong) then you had better train your neck. This fellow, a football player at the University of Tennessee-Martin, named Hunter Carter had some help from Mother Nature in that department but he also did quite a bit of work with a Neck Helmet shown here. You’ll find him featured in the July, 1976 issue of Muscular Development Magazine in an article on neck training by Carl H. Giles.

Speaking from experience, a neck helmet trains the head and neck muscles in a unique manner and is an excellent choice though it is not without its disadvantages. To build the strongest possible neck a variety of equipment and techniques can and should be used, including plate-loaded neck machines, manual resistance, neck straps, jaw and teeth lifting, isometrics, and head stands (this list is by no means exhaustive). Keep in mind that building the strength and size of the neck is like developing any other muscle group, incorporate the overload principle, train progressively and recover properly and your collar size will inevitably increase.

The Hammer Strength 4-Way Neck Machine

Posted on Thursday, February 2nd, 2012 by John Wood

The Hammer Strength 4-Way Neck Machine

Everyone should train their neck, but neck strength is especially important if you play football. The Hammer Strength neck machine is the best one I have ever used — and I’ve tried ’em all.

Use this machine strictly with no monkey business and you’ll go up a few collar sizes in no time. I recently got one from a local high school who said they were getting rid of it because “they didn’t need it any more” ~ oh brother.

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2018 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2018 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.