Homer W. Crawford

Posted on Friday, July 27th, 2018 by John Wood
On April 3, 1890, at the G.A.R. Hall in New Lisbon, Ohio, Homer W. Crawford broke the world’s record for endurance Indian club swinging by swinging a pair of 8 pound ten ouce clubs for six hours and thirty one minutes. This record was broken on January 1, 1891 by Edward W. Brown of Bath, Maine who swung a pair of 9 pound 8 ounce clubs for six hours, forty one minutes, and ten seconds (averaging sixty five full swings per minute).

Crawford regained his record on March 12, 1891 by swinging a pair of ten pound clubs for a full seven hours while averaging seventy full swinger per minute. Crawford was also an accomplished dumbbell lifter and bicycle racer. He stood 5ft 8in and weighed 149 pounds.

Charles Charlemont

Posted on Monday, September 1st, 2014 by John Wood

Joseph Charlemont essentially invented the french martial art of Savate. His son, Charles, shown above, continued his work, and codified this combat style into the form that is practiced today. Unsurprisingly, heavy club swinging and dumbbell training are just as effective today for combat training as they were around 1880, when the above picture was taken.
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Edward W. Brown

Posted on Tuesday, January 14th, 2014 by John Wood

Edward W. Brown swung a pair of INDIAN CLUBS, each weighing 8 lbs. 1-1/2 oz. continuously for 6 hours, 20 minutes in Bath, Maine on February 18, 1886 to set the (then) World endurance club swinging record.

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Professor James Harrison and his War Clubs

Posted on Friday, November 29th, 2013 by John Wood

Professor James Harrison

“… We learn that Mr. Harrison first began to use the clubs three years ago, at which time his muscular development was not regarded as being very great, his measurements being: round the chest 37-1/2 inches, round the upper arm 13-7-8ths inches, and round the forearm 13-1/4 inches.

The clubs with which Mr. Harrison commenced weighed about seven pounds each; he has advanced progressively until he can now wield with perfect ease two clubs. each weighing 37 pounds, and his heaviest weighing 47 pounds.
The effects of this exercise on the wielder’s measurements are as follows: round the chest 42-1/2 inches, the upper arm 15 inches, and the forearm 14 inches.

At the same time, his shoulders have increased immensely, and the muscles of his mid-section which were weak when he first used the clubs, are now well-developed and powerful. In short, all the muscles of the trunk have been improved by this exercise.”

Professor James Harrison
As Featured in The Illustrated London News
August 14th, 1852

Professor Harrison of London was a well-known gymnastics and physical culture teacher who was honored by Queen Victoria for his physical prowess. It was watching Professor Harrison expertly swing his heavy “war clubs” which inspired Sim Kehoe to bring club swinging back to America and promote it on a wide scale.

The Princeton Gymnastic Team, circa 1874

Posted on Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011 by John Wood

The Princeton Gymnastic Team, circa 1874, poses with large Indian Clubs and Dumbbells

A rare look at the the Princeton University Gymnastic Team of 1874. Obviously Indian Clubs were a big part of their training. The Captain and top performer, J.J. Chishom, is sitting in the middle holding the large club.