Strongfort’s Monthly

Posted on Monday, June 18th, 2018 by John Wood
Lionel Strongfort was among the many strongmen who had their own monthly periodical. It ran for 14 issues. Copies, however, are pretty hard to come by.
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Strongfort’s “Human Bridge” Act

Posted on Tuesday, April 14th, 2015 by John Wood

Strongfort’s “Human Bridge” Act

An Amazing Feat of Strength

“The bridge, touring car and half-dozen passengers aggregate a weight of 7,000 pounds, or 3-1/2 tons. As the car crosses the bridge the latter “see-saws” Strongfort being compelled not only to support the weight, but also to resist the swaying tendency of the bridge. Finally, when the car has passed just beyond the center, tipping the balance the other way, the further end of the bridge pitches down to the final landing with a jar and crash which sends a shudder through the 6,000 or more spectators at the NEW YORK HIPPODROME. The momentum of this pitching downward is equal to more than twice the dead weight of the bridge and car, and the shock is beyond all human comprehension.”

– The New York Times, February 12, 1910.

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Montana’s “Black Lion” Gives Full Credit to STRONGFORTISM for His Marvelous Strength

Posted on Tuesday, August 26th, 2014 by John Wood

Another fantastic “oldtime muscle course” advertisement: in 1927, Fred Van Norstran gambled the price of a stamp, and sent away for the famed Lionel Strongfort “Strongfortism” course… a short time later he ended up as Montana’s strongest man. Not only that, but his daughter, Pearl, who watched her father engage in these physical training lessons, eventually followed suit and learned to perform amazing feats of strength in her own right.

“If you seek great muscular strength or just plain good health, STRONGFORTISM will show you the way!”
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

You Can Banish Weakness…

Posted on Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013 by John Wood
Lionel Strongfort(aka Max Unger) was one of the first mail order muscle kings and this is one of his advertisements from 1928.

His “Strongfortism” system, which involved mostly body weight movements and light dumbbells, was incredibly popular in the early 20th century.  Strongfort was originally a pupil of Professor Attila.

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Professor Attila

Posted on Friday, January 20th, 2012 by John Wood

Professor Louis Attila

Professor Attila — real name Louis Durlacher — was the mentor of Eugen Sandow and the man who invented many of the feats of strength that we know of today: The Roman Column, The Roman Chair, supporting feats in the human bridge position and tearing packs of playing cards. It was Attiila’s idea to make globe barbells and dumbbells shot-loadable so that their weight could be adjusted. Attila invented the bent-press and was the first man to perform the lift with over 200 pounds.

In 1894, Professor opened his famous Studio of Physical Culture in downtown New York city and it became a hotbed for learning the strongman trade. In addition to Sandow, Professor Attila could list many other famous strongmen among his students: Warren Lincoln Travis, Anthony Barker, Horace Barre, Arthur Dandurand, Lionel Strongfort, George Rolandow, Louis Cyr, Bobby Pandour and Adolph Nordquest.

Attila’s daughter, Grace, later married Sig Klein.

John Hajnos ~ The Navy Hercules

Posted on Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011 by John Wood

John Hajnos, The Navy Hercules, balances a fellow officer in a chair clenched between his teeth

John J. Hajnos, originally from California, became a professional strongman after serving in the Navy in World War I. He performed a number of traditional feats but his most well-known is pictured here, supporting a fellow officer (in this case J.F. Kaska, who weighed 175 pounds) seated in a chair clenched between his jaws – an incredible test of balance as well as neck/jaw strength. Hajnos was a student of Lionel Strongfort’s “Strongfortism” system and actually once defeated Warren Lincoln Travis at an impromptu contest held at Coney Island.