Simon Javierto

Posted on Wednesday, January 23rd, 2019 by John Wood
Simon Javierto
Another look at Simon Javierto” of the Philippines who was one of Earle E. Liederman’s top mail-order students. As you can see, his results were impressive (to say the least!) Here Javierto displays phenomenal abdominal control performing a feat of muscle control that is known as “The Vacuum.”
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Ed Jubinville

Posted on Wednesday, June 27th, 2018 by John Wood
Ed Jubinville from Holyoke, Massachusetts, took up physical training after becoming inspired by an article about Eugen Sandow in Bernarr MacFadden’s Physical Culture Magazine. In fact, his first workouts were with a couple of bricks. Shortly afterward he began training with more conventional equipment at the B-6 Weightlifting Club run by Armand LaMarr… and it was Armand LaMarr who first taught him Muscle Control. Around this time, Ed also happened upon the writings of Mark Berry which he lists as being very influential.

With a solid foundation in proper weightlifting and a knowledgeable teacher, Ed Jubinville went on to become one of the greatest Muscle control experts the world had ever seen. You can read a very interesting anecdote on Ed Jubinville’s Muscle control act in The Dellinger Files Vol. I.

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

The Dellinger FIles

Posted on Tuesday, February 20th, 2018 by John Wood

Rock Solid Training Information and Iron Game Memories from the man that lived it…
By now you should be familiar with the name Jan Dellinger… but if you aren’t, he worked for the York Barbell Company for over 25 years — where he was Bob Hoffman’s right hand man, assistant editor of Muscular Development Magazine, and even shared an office with strength legend John Grimek for a number of years. He’s caught more than a few workouts with past Mr. Americas, written dozens of training articles for several major publications and sold more quality barbells than you could shake a stick at.

Well I’ve known Jan for a long time and we have been corresponding by email for the last few years now. Over the course of our conversations he would often write up some interesting story which he saw or was a part of while he worked at York. Jan had also been watching the website with great interest and a few of the topics I have written about got his creative fires going.

You want to talk strength history? Jan was there…

Last fall Jan asked if he could write up a training article or two that might be posted on the website. Of course I agreed and a few days later Jan sent something over… It was a detailed article on sandbag training.

Jan had also mentioned that he had a few other topics that he would like to cover, and, remembering the material he had written from our correspondences,I suggested that I would be delighted to collect this material into book form. I told Jan to just go wild and write about anything that he saw fit.

As I mentioned earlier, Jan has seen a lot of things over his time at York Barbell, and has been training since he was in junior high himself so he knows his way around a barbell…

We took a look at what we had, narrowed it down to a hundred and twenty five pages and dubbed it “The Dellinger Files Vol.I” (I say “Volume I” because there we have several hundred more pages of material and memories from Jan and there will be subsequent volumes)

For the time being though, Volume I is now ready to roll, and once it was all said and done it turned out even better than expected.

Take a Look Inside Volume I…

By now you’re probably dying to find out what exactly you’ll find in “The Dellinger Files volume I.” As I mentioned above, we combined some of Jan’s “Muscletown Memories” with training articles and alternated the two throughout the book. Take a look at some of the topics covered in volume I:

  • Where it All Began… How Jan started working at York Barbell and Grimek’s unique interview” process… what it was like editing Muscular Development Magazine and sharing an office with John Grimek… how Jan met Dr. Ken Leistner… adventures through the strength world, NFL weight rooms, lifting championships… and much more!
  • How to buy an Olympic Barbell… Why “saving a buck” is generally not a good idea… How long you should expect your bar to last… Exercises you should never do with a good Olympic bar… Where the money goes in the price of a quality bar… What the markings on your bar mean… The main differences between an “Olympic Lifting” Barbell and a Powerlifting Barbell…
  • Tips for lifting contests…
  • The Bruno Course… The best training course Jan has ever seen in all his years in the strength business… and it’s probably not what you might think…
  • Sandbag Training Tips… Jan’s introduction to “sandbag training,” why he was apprehensive at first, and what changed his mind… Three different methods for training with sandbags… How sandbags compare to barbells and dumbbells… How to structure a sandbag workout… Sandbag conditioning work… “PHA” sandbag training… How to combine sandbags with barbell training
  • Sergio Takes a Nap… What happened at the 1983 Ms. America bodybuilding contest and how Sergio Oliva lived up to his nickname “The Myth”
  • Two of the Very Best Bodyweight Training Exercises… what they are and which bodybuilding, legends used them to build their champion physiques…
  • Sled Pulling Tutorial… Get ready for some pretty strange looks from the neighbors… putting your “pulling” routine together… sled pulling for strength and conditioning… Dr. Ken’s influence… how-to’s, progression tips and goal
  • Behind the scenes at York Barbell… Who are celebrities who have shown up (some announced, some unannounced) at York… and what happens when they do?
  • A Different Kind of Road Work… Ever wanted to learn the finer points of car pushing? Now you can find out for yourself…
  • Range Training… How to use this unusual method of progression to build strength and move past sticking points…
  • Bodyweight Training… How a life-long barbell man makes it work… Goals, training tips and workout ideas… Where bodyweight training “fits” into a routine…
  • Negative Training… For Chins, how Robert Francis trained to win the Chinup contest at the 1998 York Barbell picnic…progression methods… how much you really need
  • Ed Jubinville’s Muscle Control Act… You won’t believe what happened, luckily someone was there to see it live…
  • One-Arm Deadlift Training Tips… find out more about this little used but highly effective grip and forearm exercise
  • The Partial Trap Bar Deadlift… A good substitute for The Jefferson Lift? You be the judge
  • Sample Workouts and Training Tips… above and beyond what is discussed in each training chapter

You want York Barbell history? — It’s in there. You want sandbag training? — It’s in there. You want grip training advice? — It’s in there….

As you can see, basic, straightforward, and to the point… great training information combined with strength memories that you will not find anywhere else… All the ingredients for a classic strength book — and what will be the first of many. Whether powerlifter, bodybuilder, garage lifter, beginner, veteran, or strength history buff, this is a title that should be in your personal library…

20 Chapters, 8-1/2″ x 11″ Size, over 51,000 Words, Sample workouts, Recommended Reading List, Glossy Cover, Printed on heavy weight paper, No pictures. The Dellinger Files Volume I is in stock and ready for immediate shipment. Get your copy today!

Order now!The Dellinger Files Vol 1. by Jan Dellinger
_________ $29.99 plus s/h

Alan P. Mead: Muscle Control Miracle

Posted on Monday, December 4th, 2017 by John Wood
Alan P. Mead lost a leg during the War and in order re-build his strength, he sought out several forms of physical training. He eventually found that he had a natural talent for Muscle Control and constant practice in this lost art made him into one of the most physically impressive men in strength history. In fact, he was often called the “Human Anatomy Chart.” Here’s a look at some of the things he had to say about the value of muscle control:

“Complete control of movement of the human body is performed entirely by contraction and relaxation of the voluntary muscles. It must be remembered that a muscle can act in one direction only and that the energy that it is capable of exerting can be converted into movement only by pulling, a muscle cannot push. The reverse action is performed by that muscle’s opponent muscle, usually situated on the opposite side of the limb or part of the body in which the movement is produced.”
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Arco’s Arm

Posted on Monday, September 25th, 2017 by John Wood
Another look at Otto Arco’s rather impressive arm. Arco only weighed 150 pounds or so, and this picture was taken nearly a hundred years ago yet you will rarely — if ever — see an arm as well developed these days. The phrase “carved out of granite” immediately comes to mind. If you are looking for some extra “peak” on your biceps or knotty forearms, you may want to give Muscle Control training a try.
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Muscle Control by Maxick

Posted on Saturday, September 16th, 2017 by John Wood
The Lost Art of Muscle Control!
“Now You Too Can Learn One of the True Lost Secrets of Oldtime Strength Training”
We’ve heard more than a few people say that the secret to
super strength is merely hard work and just putting your time
in — which is certainly partly true — but there’s more to
it than that. The Oldtime Strongmen and Physical Culture
pioneers figured out things about building great strength:
unusual techniques that almost no one knows how to
do these days.

…One of these “lost” techniques is the art of Muscle
Control, and there is no greater resource for learning
how to do it correctly than right here.

Unlike most kinds of training, Muscle Control work
can be done every day, multiple times per day,
without an equipment and the results can be
outstanding.

The increased flexibility, dexterity, and greater
blood flow to the muscular system from regular Muscle Control practice
is ideal for promoting greater recovery, making it a very valuable tool
for all strength athletes. And check out Mr. Maxick on the right, that
level of muscular development is still VERY impressive despite the fact
that photo was taken well over a hundred years ago!

If you would like to get started with Muscle Control, as long as you provide the commitment, we can provide the know-how in the form of one of the best training courses ever written on the subject:

Maxick ~ Master of Muscle Control!
The great “Maxick” ~ champion weightlifter and famous Muscle Control expert. Read on to learn more about him and his methods
Muscle Control
by Maxick

Originally published in 1910, this truly remarkable training course has run through countless editions. This was the course that started it all. The author, Maxick, was the first great Muscle Control master and it served him incredibly well. Maxick developed his own unique system to add to his weightlifting… the result was a champion physique and world class levels of strength.

In fact, Maxick was the third man in the world to put double bodyweight overhead with a lift of 322-1/2 lbs. at a bodyweight of only 145 lbs!

Throughout the course, Maxick describes in detail how, by use of concentration, you can develop and gain deliberate control of each muscle group in the body. Detailed explanations of each technique and area of the body are provided. Highlighting the instruction found in the text, are rare, high-quality photographs of each technique in action for each muscle group.

Further written tips from the master himself show you exactly what to do and how to do it.. Muscle Control should be an important part of everyone’s training and has been to some of the greatest names of the past: Eugen Sandow, Otto Arco, John Grimek, Sig Klein, John Farbotnick, and Marvin Eder, just to to name a few.

Order now!Muscle Control by Maxick
__________________ $19.99 plus s/h

* Also includes a FREE copy of our
Train Hard Bulletin paper newsletter

Muscle Control – “The Rope”

Posted on Monday, April 25th, 2016 by John Wood

The art of muscle control is about training voluntary control of involuntary muscles. Here, the great muscle control master Otto Arco demonstrates one of the most difficult and impressive muscle control feats: “The Rope.”

You’ll notice the abdominal muscles are tensed while holding an abdominal vacuum, a very striking effect. This feat is much more difficult (and much more impressive) with the arms overhead like this, indicating that Otto Arco was truly in a class by himself.

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Henry Laft ~ “The Human Skeleton”

Posted on Tuesday, April 29th, 2014 by John Wood

Henry Laft ~ "The Human Skeleton"

The German physique artist Henry Laft was so adept at Muscle Control that he was called “The Human Skeleton.” As you can see in this highly unusual pectoral control, Laft could not just control certain muscle groups, but individual muscle insertion points as well!
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Sig Klein’s Hand Balancing

Posted on Thursday, February 28th, 2013 by John Wood
Sig Klein's Hand Balancing
The fact that Sig Klein has been mentioned so many times throughout this blog should tell you that he was a jack of all trades — and he most certainly was. Name a classic training discipline and ol’ Sig was a master: muscle control… kettlebell and barbell juggling… heavy weight lifting… posing … the bent press … the list goes on and on.

One of Sig’s absolute favorite types of training was hand balancing, and he mentioned it often as the way he trained in the days before he got his weight set. Sig felt that hand balancing was not just for show but was a fantastic way to build size and strength — a viewpoint that we certainly agree with. Sig also believed that regular hand balancing was a great way to improve the press …and the results speak for themselves.

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Clevio Massimo

Posted on Friday, February 3rd, 2012 by John Wood

Italian Strongman Clevio Massimo Lifting a Giant Kettlebell

Now THAT’S a Kettlebell! …Antonio Clevio Massimo Sabatino, professionally known as Clevio Massimo, was born in Opi Labruza, Italy in 1895. When only a small boy he immigrated into the US and made Buffalo, New York his home. Shortly after finishing high school, Clevio Massimo toured the country performing strongman feats, hand balancing, adagio dancing and muscle control and for a time, even ventured into professional wrestling.  You can find out more about Clevio Massimo in The Mark Berry Bar Bell Courses.