The Tug-o-War Competition at the 1904 Olympics

Posted on Thursday, October 11th, 2018 by John Wood
“St. Louis Missouri — On Wednesday August 30th, 1904, the tug-o-war contest was pulled on the turf without the cleats, the ground having been dug up, so that the men could get some sort of hold with their feet. Six teams had entered for the honors as follows: Boers, South Africa; first and second teams of the Southwestern Turnverein, of St. Louis; Pan-Hellenic team, Greece; Milwaukee Athletic Club, Milwaukee, Wis, New York Athletic Club, New York.

In the prelimininary heats, Milwaukee defeated the Boers; the first St. Louis Turnverein team defeated the Greeks two inches after five minutes of work; and New York Athletic Club defeated the second team of the Southwestern Turnverein of St. Louis by four feet.

On Thursday, September 1st, the final rounds of the Olympic tug-o-war contest were contested and the championship when to Milwaukee Athletic Club, with the two St. Louis teams, West St. Louis Turnverein second and third; forth honors going to the New York Athletic Club.”

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

George Brosius’ Gym

Posted on Wednesday, August 29th, 2018 by John Wood
What a great gym! – This fantastic facility was established by George Brosius, a pioneer gymnastics coach and famous “Turner” in the Milwaukee area. You can read more on Brosius and his amazing story here and here. Gotta love the Indian clubs, climbing ropes, and medicine balls. This pictures dates from about 1900.

The Cincinnati Turnverein Society

Posted on Thursday, May 24th, 2018 by John Wood
The very first Turner society in America was established in Cincinnati in 1848. They had several different locations over the years but this one, on the corner of Vine Street and East Daniels Street, is near and dear to my heart as it is only a few miles from where I grew up. The building itself is still there and in remarkably good shape. Much of the original architecture in this postcard is still around. Check it out if you are ever in the Short Vine neighborhood.

The most famous Turner from the Cincinnati area was President and Chief Justice of the United States William Howard Taft. In 1909, Cincinnati was also the site of the largest Turner gathering ever held with conservative estimates of 50,000 people in attendance.

All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.

Friedrich Ludwig Jahn

Posted on Monday, April 23rd, 2018 by John Wood
The Father of gymnastics is widely regarded as Friedrich Ludwig Jahn, the German Prussian physical culture pioneer. As a commander in the Military, Jahn was shocked at the poor physical condition of the soldiers during the Napoleonic wars of the early 1800’s. As a result, Jahn devised a system of exercises and games intended to improve strength and stamina.

This gave rise to the Turnverein Movement, or gymnastic societies, which sought not only to build military readiness but also national pride through physical training pursuits.

It was Jahn who devised early models of the gymnastic equipment which are commonly today: the balance beam, horizontal bar, the parallel bars and the vaulting horse.

The North American Gymnastic Union

Posted on Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017 by John Wood
The North American Gymnastic Union was the oldest American institution for the education of teachers of physical training. It was originally established in 1866 and had many different homes. It began in New York City, then transferred to Chicago but eventually re-located after the great fire. This was the quite impressive location in Milwaukee during the late 1800’s. Shown here is a rare look at the inside and outside of this fantastic facility. Milwaukee was a hotbed of physical culture activity during that time largely due to the efforts of the Milwaukee Turners, and George Brosius.
All Contents, Including Images and Text, Copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc., Not to be reproduced without permission, All Rights Reserved
Author: John Wood. All contents, including images and text, copyright © 2005-2019 by John Wood and Thunderdome Media Inc. Not to be reproduced without permission. All rights reserved. We will most likely grant permission but please contact us if you would like to repost. IMPORTANT: Equipment and books, courses etc. pictured in blog posts are generally not available for sale unless specifically noted.